Marathon Engine Systems

 

NOTE: This hydronic schematic is typical of the engineering analysis used to design an ecopower® based heating system.

Heated water flows from ecopower® (1) unit to the Buffer tank (2). This tank is a thermal storage device that supplies hot water to the heating circuits (4) (5) and the potable water tank (7). The size of this tank is critical and typically between 200 and 315 gallons. The pump and mixer valve combination (8) is controlled by the ecopower® and mixes cold and hot water to the optimum temperature to cool the engine in the ecopower®.

The sensors (3) monitor the temperature in the Buffer Tank as well as room and outdoor temperatures. These data are fed back to the microprocessor in ecopower® so that it maintains a constant heat value in the buffer tank. The Buffer Tank(s) are designed and sized to satisfy the load from: Heating Circuit 1 (4) and Heating Circuit 2 (5), and to support the Domestic Hot Water (7) needs.

To complete the system, a complementary modulating boiler (6) is added for two reasons; to add heat to the system on degree days when needed, and as a backup heat source.

The entire system is controlled by a microprocessor in ecopower® and is fully programmable. In addition, the unit can be monitored via modem by service personnel for troubleshooting purposes.

The schematic below shows how the ecopower® microCHP functions in a hydronic (hot water based) heating system utilizing a single unit.

 

Used to augment the heat into the buffer tank for degree days where the ecopower® cannot supply all the heat required. Also used as a backup.

Can be up to seven sensors that monitor the ecopower's heat output to the buffer tank. Sensor placement is critical and designed into the system control function.
Can be up to seven sensors that monitor the ecopower's heat output to the buffer tank. Sensor placement is critical and designed into the system control function.
Can be up to seven sensors that monitor the ecopower's heat output to the buffer tank. Sensor placement is critical and designed into the system control function.
Can be up to seven sensors that monitor the ecopower's heat output to the buffer tank. Sensor placement is critical and designed into the system control function.
microCHP generates heat (cooling water from the engine) which is sent to the buffer tank through a heat exchanger in the ecopower®.
The pump/mixer valve combination is contolled by the ecopower® and mixes cold and hot water for the optimum temperature to cool the engine and supply the buffer tank with water also at optimum temperature.
This tank is a thermal storage device that supplies hot water to the heating circuits and the potable water tank (7). The size of this tank is critical, and is typically anywhere from 150 to 325 gals.
Domestic water tank. Heated from buffer tank / ecopower®.
Typical heating circuit with radiator.
Typical heating circuit with in-floor radiant heat.
Move your mouse cursor over each component for further explanation.